33 Oil Paintings By American Artist Kyle Stuckey

Kyle Stuckey Painting

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Kyle Stuckey Painting

Kyle Stuckey is an American realist painter who began studying art during his high school years simply because he needed an art credit to graduate. He then fell in love with art as he studied masters like Sargent and Waterhouse, took workshops from today’s masters, and became a member of the Putney Painters learning alongside some of the greatest artists today. Over the following decade, he continued to work with oil and develop and refine his impressionistic realism style. Today he enjoys painting an array of subject matter: people, places, and things.

Kyle has spent much time traveling around the world, painting as he goes. Originally from New Hampshire, Kyle has also spent time in Asia, Europe, Central America, and the U.S. west coast. Now he is living in Charleston, SC.

kyle’s works are available at the following galleries:

  • J.M Stringer Gallery | Vero Beach, FL
  • Illume Gallery of Fine Art | Salt Lake City, UT
  • Principle Gallery Charleston | Charleston, SC
  • The Marshall Gallery of Fine Arts | Scottsdale, AZ
  • Susan Powell Fine Art | Madison, CT

Awards and Recognitions:

  • 2020 – Finalist: Oil Painters of America, 29th Annual National Juried Exhibition, Woman in the White Dress
  • 2019/2020 – Finalist: 14th Annual Art Renewal Center Salon, In Royal Blue
  • 2019 – Finalist: Oil Painters of America, 28th Annual National Juried Exhibition, In Pale Pink I
  • 2019 – Finalist: Portrait Society of America’s Members Only Competition, Red Earring
  • 2019 – Third Place: Artist Magazine Annual Art Competition, Figure/Portrait: Femi
  • 2018 – Third Place: Oil Painters of America Fall Showcase, Marcus
  • 2018 – Finalist: Oil Painters of America, 27th Annual National Juried Exhibition, In The Light
  • 2017 – Finalist: Oil Painters of America, Eastern Regional Exhibition, Morning Light
  • 2017 – First Place: OPA Online Showcase Competition, Morning Light
  • 2017 – Second Place: OPA Online Showcase Competition, Flower
  • 2017 – Finalist: Oil Painters of America, 26th Annual National Juried Exhibition, The Fire Dancer
  • 2017 – Finalist: Bold Brush Painting Competition, Venice
  • 2017 – Certificate of Excellence: Portrait Society of America, 19th Annual International Portrait Competition, The Artist’s Critique
  • 2017 – Finalist: Richeson 75 International Art Competition, Still Life and Floral, Antique Creamer
  • 2016 – Finalist: Bold Brush Painting Competition, Yellow Hair Tie
  • 2016 – Best Floral in the Feb/Mar, Plein Air Salon Competition, Ready To Squeeze
  • 2015/2016 – Best Floral in the December/January, Plain Air Salon Competition, Blue Hydrangeas
  • 2013/2014 – Finalist: International Art Renewal Center Salon
  • 2014 – Junius Allen Memorial Award through the Salmagundi Club’s Junior Artist & Scholarship Members’ Award in NYC
  • 2014 – First Place award in oil category: Art in the Park, Keene, NH
  • 2013 – Finalist: The Artist’s Magazine Cover Competition
  • 2013 – Acceptance into NYC’s Salmagundi Club
  • 2011/2012 – Finalist in International Art Renewal Center Salon, At Rest
  • 2011 – Top 10 Finalist: American Artist Cover Competition
  • 2010 – Best of Show Award: Bold Brush Competition, Alycia II
  • 2009 – Second Place award: Southwest Art Magazine: “21 Under 31” Competition
  • 2006 – Scholarship: Scottsdale Artists School

Exhibitions:

  • November 2020: Holiday Show, group show at Susan Powell Fine Art
  • September 2020: Nature/Humanity, two-person show with Christine Lashley at Principle Gallery Charleston
  • April 2020: Timelessness, two-person show with Mary Garrish at J.M. Stringer Gallery
  • February 2020: American Miniatures, Settlers West Galleries
  • October 2019: People, Places, Things, solo show at Principle Gallery Charleston
  • February 2018: American Miniatures, Settlers West Galleries
  • October 2018: 50 Portraits of Charleston, solo charity show at Principle Gallery Charleston
  • February 2018: American Miniatures, Settlers West Galleries
  • December 2017: ‘Tis The Season, featured artist for group holiday show at J.M. Stringer Gallery
  • February 2017: American Miniatures, Settlers West Galleries
  • April 2016: Americans Abroad, two-person show with Geoffrey Leckie at J.M. Stringer Gallery
  • February 2016: American Miniatures, Settlers West Galleries

Editorial Features:

  • Make A Scene Magazine, Mid-August 2020
  • Art Mag, Summer 2019
  • Art of the West Magazine, January/February 2012
  • Southwest Art Magazine, 21 Under 31, June 2010

Artist’s Statement

I was first drawn to the art world through illustration and figurative paintings. I loved the idea of being able to tell a whole story in a single image. I would marvel at the abilities of masters like Waterhouse, Sargent, Zorn, and Bouguereau. I was not only inspired by the way they mastered their technique in controlling value, color, composition, and drawing, but also their ability to tell stories and relay emotion and experiences in their art.

I strive to do the same. I want the viewer to be able to relate to and feel what it is that I’m feeling when I see the subject matter–whether that’s a person, a scene from my travels, or a related collection of objects.

My style is impressionistic realism. I want to have an accurate rendering of my subject, but not every detail needs to be there. Like a well-written book, it does not need to be filled with every minor detail in order to tell your story. There is a place for full detail, and there is a place for simplicity and space–just enough information for viewers to understand and feel what I am saying. My work often uses the full value scale. I like to have a high contrast of lights and darks, along with accurate vibrant colors and a variety in brushwork, paint texture, and transparency.


 

Kyle Stuckey (born 1987) began studying art during his high school years by private instruction through Lori Woodward Simons and various workshops, later becoming a member of the Putney Painters where he was able to continue to hone his skills in the presence of some of the greatest artists today, including Richard Shmid and Nancy Guzik.

His work is strongly influenced by his study of historical artists including: John William Waterhouse, William Bouguereau, John Singer Sargent, Anders Zorn, and Lawrence Alma-Tadema. Over the years, he has developed and refined his style, working with oil as an Impressionistic Realism artist.

He would describe his style this way: “I paint in the way I see my subject matter, trying to mimic the way the human eye sees. Not everything is in focus at one time. Regardless of what my subject matter may be, in my paintings I focus on what I find inspiring in that subject. This way the viewer can see my vision and perhaps share in that experience. At the same time, I want my paintings to have visual variety in detail and texture by using the full potential of the oils with the variations of texture and transparency.”

He enjoys painting an array of subject matter whether it be landscape, still life, or figurative. His goal is to accomplish an accurate rendering of the subject’s beauty through form, light, and color.

The last few years Kyle has spent his time traveling around the world, painting as he goes. Originally from New Hampshire, he has spent nearly two years in Nevada. He has also spent some time in Vietnam, Japan, Mexico, Nicaragua, lived eight months in Costa Rica and two months in Rome traveling though out Italy. Now he is living in Charleston, SC, where he continues to paint until the next trip abroad. “Of course, I love to see new things and experience new cultures, but it may be even more exciting to be able to share those experiences with my clients and fans though my art.”

via: https://illumegalleryoffineart.com/artists/illume-artists/kyle-stuckey/ 


I love to see new things and experience new cultures, but it may be even more exciting to be able to share those experiences with my clients and fans though my art.”

My work is a representation of what I see.  Life experiences are a constant; we are always seeing and feeling, from the minor to the extravagant.  Beauty, fear, excitement, love, sadness, and peace are all the things that make life what it is.

When I was young aspiring artist, I would marvel at the abilities of masters like John William Waterhouse, John Singer Sargent, Anders Zorn, William Bouguereau, and many more.  I was not only inspired by the way they mastered their technique in controlling value, color, composition, and drawing, but also the ability to tell stories and relay emotion and experiences in their art.

As an artist, I strive to do the same; my passion is to capture that beauty and evoke those human emotions through my art.  I want the viewer to get lost in my work and be able to relate to and feel what it is that I’m saying.  Yes, I do create art for me; I paint the things I paint because I like them and want to paint them, but if I can create a work of art that causes someone to stop and look because they just cannot help themselves, then I have accomplished one of my goals.

My style is impressionistic realism, you could say.  I do want to have an accurate rendering of my subject, but not every detail needs to be there.  Like a well-written book or musical score, it does not need to be filled with every minor detail in order to tell your story.   There is a place for full detail, and there is a place for simplicity and space –just enough information for your audience to understand and feel what you are saying.  It is about the big picture, the artwork as a whole.

My work often uses the full value scale.  I like to have a high contrast of lights and darks, along with accurate vibrant colors and a variety in brushwork, paint texture, and transparency.

I was first drawn to the art world through illustration and figurative artwork.  I loved the idea of being able to tell a whole story in a single image.  And although that is still a passion of mine, the subject matter is somewhat irrelevant – the goal is still to capture the emotions of life experiences and its natural beauty.  If I find beauty or interest in it, and it speaks to me, then I want to paint it.

via: https://www.themarshallgallery.com/artists/stuckey-kyle/

 

Kyle Stuckey Website

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Gallery

 


Kyle Stuckey continues a lifetime of exploration through art

By Gussie Fauntleroy

This story was featured in the November 2020 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art November 2020 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

KYLE STUCKEY’S mother used to joke that when her teenage son spent an entire summer building a replica of a medieval trebuchet—a 20-foot-tall wooden catapult, powerful enough to send a pumpkin flying through the air—he just wanted to avoid some of the less-fun subjects in his homeschooling curriculum. For Stuckey, it was one more way of creatively using his hands, along with building a zip line through the forest near the family’s New Hampshire home, or constructing a climbing wall. “If something interested me, I thought: Oh! I can build that! It didn’t always work properly,” he says, laughing. He also remembers looking at architectural or landscape spaces and imagining how he could make them better, often with only the materials at hand and always with an eye to fitting in with the natural environment.

Unlike many future artists, Stuckey wasn’t enamored with drawing at the time, but his fascination with designing and building was a prelude of what was soon to come. “Art is geometry, symmetry, visual beauty—like a lot of my childhood experimenting—so that’s probably why it came so easily,” he says. It was during his senior year of high school that he finally discovered his love of drawing and painting, and found out he was pretty good at it. From that point on, the kid whose biggest passion had been baseball surprised his family and friends with a 180-degree turn in the direction of art. As it turned out, innate talent and an uncommon level of focus and dedication for his age put him on an accelerated track. Now 33, he already has enjoyed 10 years of a successful painting career.

STUCKEY’S introduction to art was through private instruction from a painter and family friend, Lori Woodward Simons, who was enlisted to pro-vide Kyle with the art education required for graduation. “I went into it thinking, I need to do this, and it could be pretty fun,” he remembers. Among his first assignments was to page through art magazines and tear out photos of all the paintings, regardless of style, genre, or time period, that really caught his eye. When he finished, almost every image in his stack was figurative, primarily portraits by artists including John Singer Sargent and John William Waterhouse. “They were probably brilliantly composed in ways I didn’t understand at the time, but for me they were intriguing and had life to them, [posing] a what-if question—why did they paint this person, what’s their backstory?” he says. “It’s still true for me now: I love painting people, the storytelling and finding ways to capture them in that moment.”

Stuckey studied with Simons for about four years, at first formally and then on a mentorship basis, and he also began taking workshops with other artists. When he was 19 he accompanied Simons a few times to meetings of the Putney Painters in Putney, VT, led by internationally ac-claimed artists Richard Schmid and Nancy Guzik. Soon he was one of the youngest painters invited to be a member of the group. Three years later he was selected for Southwest Art’s annual “21 Under 31” feature, which introduces young artists with potential. As a result, doors began to open for him, including gallery representation. Equally important was the confidence that came with professional recognition. “Before, family and friends would tell me what I painted was great, but once strangers say it, it solidifies the idea that maybe I am good enough to make a run at it.” Besides, he reasoned at the time, “I’m only 23. I have the time to make this happen.”

For a while Stuckey continued to work part time as a carpenter in his father’s construction business while building a collector base. As painting sales increased, his need for other work went down and the opportunity for travel—one of his favorite activities—went up. He spent time in Nevada, where he met his future wife, Taylor. Together they lived for a year in Costa Rica, for three months in a tiny studio apartment in Rome, and on the New England coast. Eventually they traveled to Mexico, Puerto Rico, Europe, Asia, and the West Coast.

In 2019 the couple honeymooned in Paris, the first visit there for either of them. While strolling through the streets one evening, Stuckey found himself visually arrested by one of the city’s countless sidewalk cafés. The resulting painting, PARIS CAFÉ, captures the qualities that draw him to a scene, especially the human, storytelling element. “I love that café culture, with everyone gathered around, enjoying each other’s company and enjoying being outside,” he says. He was also artistically intrigued by the contrast of warm café lights and cooler streetlamps. But what trans-formed the scene into a special experience was that after he had taken some photographs, he and Taylor sat at one of the outdoor tables for a drink. “It represents a memory, not just a beautiful scene,” he says.

At some point the artist and his wife were ready to unpack their suitcases and find a place to call home. They settled on Charleston, SC, attracted by the ocean, warm climate, and lively art scene. A bonus is the city’s historic downtown and handsome colonial architecture, as well as the marshes and Lowcountry landscape, all of which find their way into his paintings. Even when he’s not traveling, Stuckey always has a camera (or smartphone) with him and his “art brain” turned on, as he puts it, on the lookout for whatever suggests the promise of excitement and challenge at the easel. It may be a landscape, city scene, still-life arrangement, or interesting person—the figure remains among his favorite genres.

SOMETIMES THE painting experience becomes an opportunity for Stuckey to reconnect with the roots of his artistic journey—and to trust his own creative judgment. That’s what happened while he was working on IN THE MEADOW. The image of a pensive young woman sitting in the breeze among wildflowers began as a larger piece. It contained much more background, including forested landscape and an expanse of sky. As he worked on it, though, Stuckey realized that the painting was asking to be less. He pared it down to the essentials, creating a strong, simple com-position highlighting the model’s reflective mood and the quiet beauty of sunlight through the yellow flowers and her flowing hair. “I thought: Why make it bigger than it needs to be? I make the rules here. I can cut this down and make it what it probably should have been from the beginning.” The painting also became a sort of tribute, paying homage to Waterhouse in the wind’s movement and a romantic sense of captured time. “It’s going back to what intrigued me from the very beginning. It reminds me of why I started painting in the first place,” Stuckey says.

IN THE MEADOW also reflects a way of perceiving space that the artist absorbed while growing up. His tiny rural hometown of Stoddard, NH, is surrounded by woods, limiting visual distance to what he calls a “closed and comforting” range. Even in the cityscapes he chooses to paint, he finds spots with a “cozy, personal feeling—tight, narrow streets or anywhere there are quiet places in the middle of this very busy machine.” Painting evening and nighttime imagery is another way of tucking the viewer into an intimate visual space within a larger scene. Especially with nocturnes, Stuckey continues a lifelong love of experimentation. He asks himself: “Can you capture the atmosphere of light? Not the atmosphere of humidity or air, but the atmosphere that different light sources and temperatures and colors of light create in the dark?”

Although most of his travel has been on hold during the pandemic, Stuckey says that even something like a weekend trip into North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains is enough to kick his “art brain” into high gear. “For me, just seeing new places and things is inspiring, whether it’s extremely different or just a slight variation from the everyday,” he says. That doesn’t mean he deliberately sets out to find subjects. In fact, he tries not to try. He just sets out. Then, as he meanders through an older section of Charleston or along a beach, or sits in a restaurant with his wife, painting ideas tend to show up. One recent rediscovery has been a series of tonal works. Applying only two colors—one warm, one cool, no white—Stuckey paints familiar subjects in a way that takes him “back to the basics of drawing and using values to create form. It’s fun to explore that,” he says. Yet even as he dips into this more simplified approach, he brings with him years of training and experience. “I’m finding new ways to keep it fresh and move forward,” he says. “I’m pushing boundaries while producing what is still clearly a Kyle Stuckey body of work.”

Via: southwestart.com

 

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